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Letter to Ollie's New Superintendent: Defining a Vision for your District

District Leaders: Recently, I received a call from an EdLeader21 PLC member, and was thrilled to learn that she had been appointed Superintendent of the district that my grandson Ollie attends. I decided to capture my advice to her in this blog series, in collaboration with AASA. I invite you to collaborate with me to support this new superintendent in her journey to prepare Ollie and his classmates for life in the 21st century. Throughout this school year, we will offer advice related to different areas of 21st century district transformation. -- Ken

This item originally appeared on the AASA Engage blog on November 3, 2015.


Dear Ollie’s Superintendent,

Congratulations on your first superintendency. What a great milestone in your career! I am so thrilled that you will lead my grandson’s district and that he will learn in an environment that is purposeful and intentional about preparing students for the challenges of the 21st century.

Before Ollie was born, as I traveled throughout the country advocating for an updated model of education, I would ask educators two questions:

If your child or grandchild masters math, science, English and social studies, will you consider them prepared for the future?

Inevitably, they said “no.”

If your child or grandchild becomes a strong critical thinker, problem solver, communicator, collaborator and creative innovator, will you feel they are ready for the future?

Most of them said “yes.” Now that Ollie is entering the 1st grade, I can honestly say that Ollie will be ready for his future if his school system prepares him with these competencies. From my perspective, here is your first challenge: Help your new district define the competencies that will prepare students for the challenges of 21st century.

Two Key Pieces of Advice

1.  Be a good listener, but listening doesn't mean you can't ask questions.

Listening is probably the most important thing a new superintendent needs to do. Listening will help you learn about your work ahead, but I recommend listening while you try to get answers to the following questions:

  • Do we have a shared understanding about the essential skills that students need for 21st century life and work?
  • Is our district intentional and purposeful about developing our students’ capacities to demonstrate these skills?
  • Upon graduation, are all students ready for the future?

2. Focus on a “Profile of a Graduate”

As you engage in conversations, begin to float the idea of constructing a profile of a graduate that clarifies the 21st century skills that students should demonstrate beyond disciplinary content. One way to think about this is to ask, “What competencies do you want every graduate to have when they graduate in 2027?” That happens to be the year Ollie will graduate from high school! Here are a few examples of districts that have taken on the challenge of creating a "profile of a graduate”:

Fairfax County Public Schools Portrait of a Graduate

Jeffco 2020 Vision Development and Strategic Planning

Loudoun Vision 20/20

I hope that you find these tips and resources helpful as you get started. Best wishes with the start of the school year!

Sincerely,
Ken


This item originally appeared on the AASA Engage blog on November 3, 2015.